About

I was here, and this is what I saw ...

I've always been interested in photography ever since I discovered National Geographic and great photographers like Jodi Cobb and William Albert Allard. I never liked the stories about animals or plants, for me it was always the stories about places and the people in them, places I'd never heard of, but which made me want to go there and see them for myself. 
Inspired, I bought a camera and learned how to develop film, but then life got in the way, and I took a break from serious photography for a while as the kids grew up. When things got a little quieter and I had more I time picked up my camera again four years ago, followed a few courses and workshops, and got out there again, documenting the world around me.
I like simplicity and silence. When I look back over my images and say to myself "I was here, and this is what I saw”, then I want that to come through. We all live such busy lives with little time to just stop, look up from our screens, and not feel overwhelmed by all that goes on around us. So, I try and capture those rare moments of silence, of banality, and the ordinary, which can be beautiful in its own unique way.  

Inspiration
I love the work of many photographers, some famous, some not so much. I much admire William Eggleston and Fred Herzog for their colour work, and for making it okay to picture the boring and the banal. Saul Leiter also fits into that category, as does the colour work of Vivian Maier, work that never fails to inspire for its simplicity and beauty. The work of Stephen Shore is another source of inspiration, as is the work of several of the artists that eventually came to form what we now call "The New Topographics" movement. The images that Steve McCurry created in India are nothing short of breath-taking, as is the work of Don McCullin.

There's a load of people I follow on Instagram whose work I admire - I won't list them all (there's too many, really) but I'll add a list of the new interesting one's I find every month in the blog
Back to Top